Cromwell Place

4 Cromwell Place, South Kensington

London, SW7 2JE

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Opening times

Until Sunday 22nd November

Open Wednesday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm and Sundays 12pm – 4pm

Please pre-book your free tickets before visiting.

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About the Exhibition

By the time the De Morgans met in 1883, they were both established professional artists. They were married in 1887 and moved to their first home together at 1 The Vale, Kings Road, Chelsea. Neither was a stranger to the area. William’s first pottery business was at his home at 7 Cheyne Row, and Evelyn had her studio at 17a Edith Grove. Funeral services were held for both of the artists at Chelsea Old Church, one journalist describing their deaths as a ‘great blow to artistic Chelsea’.

This exhibition brings the De Morgans artworks back home to Chelsea for the first time in a century, to celebrate the De Morgan Foundation’s partnership with Cromwell Place.

This exhibition marks the beginning of the Foundation’s exciting new partnership with Cromwell Place.

Nestled between the National History Museum and V&A in South Kensington, Cromwell Place is the former studio and home of artist Sir John Lavery which has been beautifully converted to host a rolling programme of its exclusive members’ exhibitions and is set to be an exciting artistic hub.

William and Evelyn De Morgan lived and worked within walking distance of Cromwell Place for their entire married life. To celebrate the return of the De Morgan Collection to the area of London which the De Morgans loved, Homecoming showcases of paintings and drawings with particular significance to the De Morgans’ lives.

Online Tour

If you can’t make it to the exhibition in South Kensington, De Morgan Curator Sarah Hardy takes you on a video tour of the exhibition from the comfort of home.

London’s new hub for the arts, offering a first-of-its-kind flexible gallery space and exciting public programme of arts exhibitions.

The De Morgans in Chelsea

William and Evelyn De Morgan (c.1890) by an unknown photographer

By the time the De Morgans met in 1883, they were both established professional artists. This perhaps explains why Evelyn De Morgan chose to attend the fancy dress party where they met as a tube of ‘rose madder’ red paint. William quipped he was ‘madder still’ and it wasn’t long before the pair were engaged.

They were married in 1887 and moved to their first home together at 1 The Vale, Kings Road, Chelsea. Neither was a stranger to the area. William’s first pottery business was at his home at 7 Cheyne Row, with kilns of his own design in the garden, and a showroom nearby Orange House which sold the tiles and plates he designed. Evelyn had trained at the National Art Training School in South Kensington (now the Royal College of Art) and then at Slade School of Art, where she had mastered her craft of drawing and painting.

In 1910, their beloved home was to be destroyed. They held a house cooling party before moving to 127 Old Church Street. During their final years here, Evelyn held an solo exhibition of paintings in response to the horror of the First World War at her studio at 17a Edith Grove, and William enjoyed a successful second career as an author.

Funeral services were held for both of the artists at Chelsea Old Church, one journalist describing their deaths as a ‘great blow to artistic Chelsea’.

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