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This post is part of our From The Archives blog series

William’s mother Sophia kept a detailed ‘Nursery Journal’ which depicts the early lives of her children. This page taken from the journal is proof positive that William wasn’t the only De Morgan with an artistic flair – the bold lines and confident execution in this sketch by his sister Alice show that she, too, was a budding young artist. 

This post is part of our From The Archives blog series

This letter from our archives is a perfect example of cross-writing, a practice that was common in the 19th Century. It involved writing a page of text, turning the page ninety degrees, and adding a second layer of text: 

This post is part of our From The Archives blog series

This rather unusual note comes, unsurprisingly, from an archive box labelled ‘Miscellaneous’. It is a handwritten cure for gout – we can’t recommend that you try this at home.

Click to enlarge

This post is part of our From The Archives blog series

We have only a handful of photographs of William De Morgan in our archive, and even less of Evelyn, and most of these taken in her later years. So this early photograph, found nestled in a family photo album, is a particular treasure.

This post is part of our From The Archives blog series

Our archive contains hundreds of letters and other correspondence, many of them detailing fairly humdrum everyday goings-on, some of them portraying Mrs Stirling's tireless efforts to obtain some of Evelyn's paintings, and occasionally we'll find a fascinating gem that will elicit a chuckle. This one from our archive definitely falls in the latter category. 

As well as ~60 oil paintings, hundreds of ceramics, and over 500 drawings, the De Morgan Foundation has in its collection a fairly substantial archive. It is a varied and fascinating collection of primary sources (including material from Evelyn De Morgan, John Roddam Spencer Stanhope, Sophia De Morgan, William De Morgan and A.M.W. Stirling). There is also a range of additional, miscellaneous material, such as photographs, cartes des visite, family legal documents, and contemporary reviews. This material provides invaluable contextual information for the collections.

In the summer of 2013, we welcomed John Swarbrooke, a recent graduate of Courtauld Institute of Art, to assist us in curating our Men In Pants exhibition. Here's a short piece he wrote about his experience at the De Morgan Centre, illustrated by a number of Evelyn's drawings from our collection. 

 

On the centenary of her death on 26th January 2014, we take a brief look at the legacy of Jane Morris

“Beauty like hers is genius”Dante Gabriel Rossetti

We recently invited our Friends to join us for an Arts and Crafts evening, with some informative talks and the chance to look at some wonderful antiques alongside our permanent collection.

We kicked off the evening with a glass of bubbly and a browse of the gallery and our temporary Teepee Glass exhibition – on a blustery November evening, we think there’s no better place to be than the warm, glowing surroundings of the De Morgan Centre!

 

In September 2013, the De Morgan Foundation hosted a group visit for our Friends to Red House in Bexleyheath. Here is a review of the visit, written by Jean McMeakin:

 

Nestled behind a modest brick wall with a small blue plaque on an ordinary suburban street in Bexleyheath, we stroll down the shady path to The Red House.  Warmly welcomed by Claire and Emma, we make use of our early arrival to take a peek around the lovely gardens before joining other members eager to start our tour.