Blog

The Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice is a public monument in Postman's Park in the City of London, commemorating ordinary people who died saving the lives of others. It is, in Watts's words, a record 'of the stories of heroism in every-day life'.

Great, great grand-nephew of William De Morgan, Barry, shares his anedotes of Wilhemina Stirling, who founded the De Morgan collection.

In early June, I spent a wonderful afternoon with Barry De Morgan (whose great-grandfather was William De Morgan's uncle) whilst he kindly let me record his accounts of Mrs Stirling, Evelyn De Morgan's sister, who began the De Morgan Foundation, who he knew as a young man.

This William De Morgan tile panel recently surfaced at auction in Buckinghamshire. It shows a snake below two doves in a fruit tree. The design is in De Morgan's archive at the Victoria and Albert Museum (see Greenwood book, page 154, V&A ref no 452), and the quality of execution leaves no real doubt as to the attribution.

Scholar and researcher, Rosemary Pemberton, reveals the De Morgan ceramics in the Pitt Rivers collection.

Earlier in February adult education tutor Katja Robinson presented a lecture entitled Walter Crane and William De Morgan: Fairy Tales and Fantasy as part of a 5 week Arts & Crafts Adventures course for Edinburgh Council's further learning programme.

 

The De Morgans and Suffrage

By Dr Lucy Ella Rose, Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Surrey. Her collaborative doctoral award from the University of Surrey and Watts Gallery supported her research on women in nineteenth-century creative partnerships. Attached is a link to purchase her publication on the De Morgan's with a 30% discount.

Mary Evelyn Pickering (1855-1919) is often described as the wife of famous Arts and Crafts potter, William De Morgan. Indeed, her sister and biographer named her book of reminiscences on the couple as William De Morgan and his Wife. However, she was in fact a talented and pioneering female artist, who battled for recognition and respect in the male dominated Victorian art world.

                                                               

 

In this blog Art History student Callista Aston from the University of Auckland explains how she helped the De Morgan Foundation to identify the source material for a study in our collection by Evelyn De Morgan: D_EDM_0390. The study is one of several copies which we believe Evelyn undertook in situ at various museums whilst training to be an artist.

A much under researched part of William De Morgan's oeuvre is his designs for stained glass. Between 1865 and 1872 he was known to have worked on stained glass production with Edward Burne-Jones for Morris and Co. As well as contributing to some of Burne-Jones’s commissions he also worked on commissions by himself and we are aware that he created designs for 8 churches across the country, of which we believe 5 are still in situ.